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How to Write a Good Speech

1. Read your speech out loud

❶The more comfortable and open you are, the more your audience will feel drawn to you.

Speechwriting 101: Writing an Effective Speech

How to Write a Speech: Step 1 - Audience
2. Create a dream board
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Remember that engaging hook we talked about? That goes in now. Dive right in, getting personal and showing your human side. Opening with important remarks or quotes will immediately establish credibility. Just don't use Merriam Webster as your go-to expert; avoid cliches at all costs. Use inclusive terms for individuals.

Your audience will feel more included and a sense of belonging. If "we" feel that way, they'll feel the pressure to feel that way, too. In a speech by Nelson Mandela, he started off with, "Today we celebrate not the victory of a party, but a victory for all the people of South Africa.

Build the body of the speech. This part should contain the main points of the issue and support for each one. That list you made earlier? Narrow it down to about three. Which ones are the most convincing? Start off with your strongest point. You want the audience to start off seeing zero holes through your argument.

Get them on your side before they get the chance to nitpick what you have to say. Put your weakest argument in the middle. You're sandwiching it here to make it the most forgettable. And, indeed, it will be. End with your second strongest argument. You want to vamp it up a notch towards the end. Reel them back in, rounding out your argument with your last piece of evidence. Be aware of your transitions. Build clear and sensible transitions from one thought to the next.

The biggest mistake speakers and writers make is to assume people will follow leaps of logic -- place, time or changes of ideas. Spell out to the audience when you are taking a turn in your thoughts with phrases like: Transitions should not only go in between points in the body, but also after the introduction and into the conclusion. Again, your speech is one cohesive work, not a series of points that work independently.

Show your audience that by transitioning clearly. End with a firm conclusion. Conclude with a powerful nail-down, summarizing what you came here to say. Leave them with a question or thoughts of implications; leave them with something -- what do you want that something to be? Make the audience recall and get on the mainline. Be sure they leave with the ideas you don't want them to forget.

Give your audience a sense of completion in what you write. Bring them back to the beginning, but with a louder spirit -- after all, they have all the knowledge necessary to be passionate now, too. This can be done by starting the last paragraph with a strong, declarative sentence that re-makes your point. Deliver it to someone. This will be the most beneficial thing you can possibly do. Try to get someone that's as similar to your audience as possible.

If they have a similar background, there's a better chance of them having the same impression. Ask them for feedback. Did they find anything confusing? What questions were they left with? Did they follow your logic and end up agreeing with you? What impression were they left with? Often when we write things, there's a much easier way to say the exact same thing. Go over your work with an eye for this. Take each sentence as it stands -- could you make it more crystal?

If you're not clear, you could have a good point that goes unappreciated or completely missed. Clarity is possibly the most important quality to look for in your work. Ensure your tone is constant and appropriate. If it sounds like three different people wrote it, it'll be difficult to follow. What's more, if you slip into language that's condescending or simply over their heads, you're in an equally hard place. How will the audience find your speech? Don't be tempted to get crass or nasty to get their attention.

It'll work, but after you stop the finger-pointing and yelling, they'll tune you out completely. Write out your final draft. Once you have all the content ready, get it in its final form. This is where you may want to start employing tactics for delivery.

Write in your pauses. Though the speech should not be directly read from, rehearsing from it with pauses written in will help you remember when you are actually delivering it. Write in body cues. Though these ultimately need to be natural and can't be scripted, making little notes where you might want to emphasize a point with your body be it with your face, hand, etc.

Outline the speech on notecards. Since you won't be reading your speech, it's a good idea to have a written outline of the presentation as a reference so you don't leave something out.. Start with an interesting line that will catch your audience's attention or surprise them. This will make you more approachable and your speech more relatable.

It will draw your audience in and keep them captivated. Not Helpful 34 Helpful A question is a great way to start a speech. Follow up the question with some facts that prove your argument, then conclude your speech by answering the question you started with. Not Helpful 23 Helpful It's okay to use basically any form of speech in a speech, as it is simply talking when you think about it.

The key is to match the message to the audience, so bear that in mind when writing it. Not Helpful 33 Helpful The format of a speech is the introduction, the body, and lastly, the conclusion. Not Helpful 36 Helpful Yes, you should use pronouns in your speech. For example, after you mention someone by name, like "Eloise Smith," you can replace the name with "she" to avoid repeating the name too often. Not Helpful 25 Helpful Start out with your introduction on modeling.

What makes you interested in it? Include three points about it. Fill the next three paragraphs explaining these three points, and the fourth, last paragraph drawing your conclusion on modeling. Acknowledge the sadness of the event and what people can do to help prevent something like this again.

For example, if the event was a forest fire that was caused by human contact, you can speak about making sure campfires are fully out before leaving, or that cigarettes should be banned from the woods. If the event was caused by harmful behavior, like an unlawful attack on people, you can explain how guns can be dangerous and how we can better resolve issues. Not Helpful 19 Helpful First of all, do your research.

Learn as much as you can about this animal, even if you don't really care much about that animal in the beginning, your research will tell you something that might interest you. Leading you to also be a bit passionate when you speak.

Use intriguing facts and statistics, and some funny ones. Have an overall message, something you want the people listening to your speech to take away with them, such as why it is important to spay cats, why it is vital to care for orangutans in palm plantations or why it is crucial to protect animals in peri-urban areas.

Sometimes, it can be a simple "for example" or "for instance. Not Helpful 13 Helpful Research as much as you can and assemble your notes properly.

Then, write your speech to sound more normal and a little less factual. Make sure you are well prepared and taught in your subject of science. Not Helpful 22 Helpful How do I write a speech about space? Im also having trouble how to write the conclusion.

Answer this question Flag as How to begin my speech on importance of value education what should be the content.

What do I need to do to get started on this kind of life style. Which types of speeches are really interesting? How can my speech introduction be like for Nature? Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Already answered Not a question Bad question Other. Quick Summary To write a speech, start off with an attention-grabbing statement, like "Before I begin my speech, I have something important to say. Did this summary help you? Let the final, forceful sentence be the natural ending of your speech.

People remember the last point or emphasis; so hit it strongly! Avoid a flat or pathetic: Insist on your important points! Don't make any changes to your speech just because you think people will judge you stand up to peer pressure. Make changes because you want them, and are comfortable with your edits. Think hard before incorporating flip charts or a dry-erase board into your presentation.

Eventually you may find yourself talking to your flip chart and not to the audience. You'll also find a downloadable, printable blank speech outline template. The basic speech format is simple. It consists of three parts: Think of it as a sandwich. The opening and ending are the slices of bread holding the filling body together. You can build yourself a simple sandwich with one filling or you can go gourmet and add up to three or even five.

The choice is yours. But whatever you choose to serve, as a good cook, you need to consider who is going to eat it! And that's your audience. Consider HOW you can explain show, tell that to your audience in the most effective way for them to easily understand it.

A good speech is never written from the speaker's point of view. If you need to know more about why check out this page on building rapport. To help you write from an audience point of view, identify either a real person or the type of person who is most likely to be listening to you. Make sure you select someone who represents the "majority". That is they are neither struggling to comprehend you at the bottom of your scale or light-years ahead at the top. Now imagine they are sitting next to you eagerly waiting to hear what you're going to say.

Give them a name, for example, Joe, to help make them real. After you've finished, take notes. If this is your first speech the safety net of having everything written down could be just what you need.

It's easier to recover from a patch of jitters when you have a full set of notes than if you have either none or a bare outline. Do not assume because you know what you're talking about the person Joe you've chosen to represent your audience will too. Joe is not a mind-reader. Check for jargon too. These are industry, activity or group exclusive words. If you're an outsider you won't know them and that's alienating.

Read what you've written out loud. If it flows naturally continue the process with your next main idea. If it doesn't, rework. Remember you are writing "oral language". You are writing as if you were explaining, telling or showing something to someone. It doesn't have to be perfect sentences. We don't talk like that. We use whole sentences and part ones, and we mix them up with asides or appeals e.

Of course you did. Let's move it along. Is your speech being evaluated? Find out exactly what aspects you're being assessed on using this standard speech evaluation form. Between each of your main ideas you need to provide a pathway. This links them for your listeners.

The clearer the path, the easier it is to make the transition from one idea to the next. If your speech contains more than three main ideas and each is building on the last, then consider using a "catch-up" or summary as part of your transitions. Everybody died BUT their ghosts remained, 2. His partner reformed and after a fight-out with the hero, they both strode off into the sunset, 3.

And now what about one more? What if nobody died? Go back through your main ideas checking the links. Remember Joe as you go. Try each transition or link out loud and listen to yourself. Write them down when they are clear and concise. The ideal ending is highly memorable. You want it to live on in the minds of your listeners long after your speech is finished.

Often it combines a call to action with a summary of major points. The desired outcome of a speech persuading people to vote for you in an upcoming election is that they get out there on voting day and do so.

You can help that outcome along by calling them to register their support by signing a prepared pledge statement as they leave. The desired outcome is increased sales figures. The call to action is made urgent with the introduction of time specific incentives.

Can you do it? Will you do it? The kids will love it. Your wife will love it. A clue for working out what the most appropriate call to action might be, is to go back to the original purpose for giving the speech. Was it to motivate or inspire? Was it to persuade to a particular point of view? Was it to share specialist information? Was it to celebrate a person, a place, time or event? Visit this page for more about how to end a speech effectively. You'll find two additional types of endings with examples.

Once you've got the filling main ideas the linking and the ending in place, it's time to focus on the introduction. The introduction comes last as it's the most important part of your speech. This is the bit that either has people sitting up alert or slumped and waiting for you to end. Ideally you want an opening that makes listening to you the only thing the 'Joes' in the audience want to do.

You want them to forget they're hungry or that their chair is hard or that their bills need paying. Hooks come in as many forms as there are speeches and audiences. Your task is work out what the specific hook is to catch your audience.

Go back to the purpose. Why are you giving this speech?

2. Simple phrases are your friend

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Jan 19,  · The Chief of Staff taught me the rules for writing a great speech -- the hard way. Billionaires All Billionaires Opinions expressed by .

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Whether you are a communications pro or a human resources executive, the time will come when you will need to write a speech for yourself or someone else.

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And NOW you are finished with "how to write a speech", and are ready for REHEARSAL. Please don't be tempted to skip this step. The "not-so-secret" secret of successful speeches combines good writing with practice, practice and then practicing some more. Having a good speech is a lot like making a good cake. Having the right ingredients is the key to its success. You can deliver a successful speech with just a few easy steps. Ask yourself what your main idea is. Outline the key components of your idea and the ultimate goal for your speech. It should.

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Aug 11,  · To make a good speech for school, choose a theme or topic to focus your speech on so it's easier to write. When you're writing your speech, stick with simple language so your audience understands and doesn't get bored%(). Remember that you're writing a speech, not an essay. People will hear the speech, not read it. The more conversational you can make it sound, the better. So try these tips: Use short sentences. How do you pick one? A good idea is to look inside yourself and find out what you feel very deeply about. Maybe it's the environment.