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How to Write a Character Sketch

Create an Outline of Your Character

❶This particular paragraph delves a little into her personality and a little about who she is as a person.

How to Write a Character Analysis Essay: Student’s Mini-Guide

Answer Questions in Paragraph Form
What is a Character Analysis Essay?
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An interview with an expert might give a lot of details too. Reveal the chosen character trough dialogues, narrative, and plot. A character analysis essay outline is a must-have action plan to implement if you wish to succeed in your writing.

How could a character analysis essay introduction look like? Most people tend to view Batman as a positive character. It is a good idea to show another side. Stress these people had a chance if not Batman.

You may come up with the argumentative points. The summary of these points will work for the character analysis essay conclusion; in the body, a writer should also add evidence like in-text citations. Recall some episodes from the movie or comics to support your view. What struggles does your character encounter? Think about how Huck grows and learns throughout the story. In the beginning, he is more likely to get caught up in schemes like faking his own death ; but later on, he avoids the trickery he observes like when he tries to ditch the deceptive duke and king.

As you read, take notes on all important elements that add to the depth of the main character as you read the work for a second time. Make notes in the margins and underline important passages.

You can also keep a notebook handy while you're reading to help you keep track of your thoughts about the character as you read. Choose a main idea. Gather all of your notes about the character and try to think of the main idea relating to them. This will be your thesis statement for your character analysis. Think about their actions, motivations, and the outcome of their story line. Maybe your thesis idea will be something about how the character embodies the struggles of growing up as a young boy, or about the inherent good in people.

Maybe your character shows readers that even people who make horrible mistakes are capable and deserving of redemption. For the Huck Finn example, you might choose something about the hypocrisy of civilized society since, in essence, the novel is about a boy who was brought up to support enslaving blacks, but decides, through his experiences with Jim on the river, to value Jim as a person and a friend rather than just as a slave.

Similarly, Huck's own father captures and "enslaves" Huck, a situation that Huck eventually escapes and mirrors Jim's own quest for freedom. Society views Huck's escape as moral and just, but Jim's escape is a terrible crime to the townspeople. In this contradiction lies a major crux of the story. Once you have decided on your main idea, make a brief outline of all of your supporting material. Make note of each place in the text where your character displays the characteristic you've chosen for your thesis.

Include complicating evidence that allows the character to have more depth. Keeping your thesis idea in mind, prepare an introductory paragraph about the character you have chosen and the role that he or she plays in the literary work.

Describe the physical appearance of the character. Describe what your character looks like and explain what their appearance reveals about them as a person.

Make sure to quote or paraphrase directly from the work. Think about Huck's ragged clothes and what that says about his character. Discuss how Huck dresses up like a little girl to find out the news in town and how this altered appearance influences your analysis of Huck.

Discuss your character's background. If provided, include details about the personal history of the character some of these details may have to be inferred. People's histories inevitably influence their personality and personal development, so it is important to discuss your character's history if you can. What kind of education does the character have?

How does the character's past experience influence what he or she does or says? Discuss Huck's relationship with his father and with the Widow Douglas and Miss Watson, who take him in. How do these characters influence Huck's development? Discuss the character's language use.

Analyze the language that the character uses throughout the work. Does the character use the same language throughout or does his or her choice of language change from the introduction to the conclusion? Huck has an admittedly vulgar attitude for a little boy and often does not speak in a way that the Widow Douglas approves of.

He does try hard to obey her and act appropriately in church, but he often missteps and announces himself, through his actions and words, as a person who is far less civilized than he pretends to be, or than the Widow would like him to be. Write about the personality of the character. Does the character act on emotions or reason?

What values does the character exhibit through words or actions? Does the character have goals or ambitions? Be specific and make sure to quote or paraphrase from the work. Huck Finn tries to abide by the rules of society, but at the end of the day he acts based on emotions. He decides to rescue Jim from being returned to his master, even though it is against the law, because he believes that Jim does not deserve to be treated like a slave. Huck decides this on his own, in direct opposition to the values his society has taught him.

Analyze the character's relationships with others. Think about how your character interacts with others in the story. Does the character lead or follow others in the story? Does the character have close friends and family? Use examples from the text along with your analysis. Describe how the character changes or grows throughout the plot of the story. Most major characters will experience conflict throughout the course of a story.

Memorable characters usually change or grow in a literary work of merit. Huck's external conflict relies on all of the events that take place on his journey down the river - the physical struggle of the trip, his mishaps along the way, getting caught up in various scandals and schemes, etc. His internal conflict reaches its climax when Huck decides to help Jim attain freedom from slavery. This is a crucial moment in the story where Huck follows his heart instead of his social conscience.

Is he or she sitting in a park? Is your character working on a boat? Asking what your character is doing will not only help you understand your character, but also his or her relationship to the setting in your story.

Authors may be tempted to gloss over this part of characterization. When asked what his or her character is doing, an author might give a cursory answer; he or she may answer that the subject is at the movies, for example. But consider all that there is to do at a movie theatre: Is the character waiting in line for tickets or at the concession stand? Is he or she waiting to talk to the manager? Perhaps the character is sitting impatiently waiting for the movie to begin.

Getting as specific as you can when answering this question will not only help you define your character, but will also help to define the other elements of fiction. This is probably one of the more complex questions you can ask about your character. Is your character angry? Is he or she happy, sad, tired, or depressed? Does your character love something or someone?

Asking questions about your character's emotional life might evolve into the production of a character history.

While this may be tempting, you have to focus on what your subject is feeling within the context of the story you are writing. Although the answers to these questions are important, they are rarely explicitly stated in the story. Authors may be tempted to start with the emotional or psychological state of their characters and they may even explicitly state them.

This can lead to one of the cardinal sins of fiction writing: Implicitly showing how your character is feeling by his or her interactions with other characters or the setting is infinitely more interesting to read than explicitly stating whether your character is happy, sad, elated, joyful, or miserable. A sketch is a starting point. In the visual arts, artists carry around sketch pads to practice and develop the fundamental skills of their craft with the aim of producing paintings that seem to jump off the canvas, or sculptures that seem to move in just the right light.

The same is true for authors who use character sketches. Writers use this tool to develop and rehearse one of the fundamental skills of their craft—characterization. However, the final goal is not to have a notepad full of character sketches. An author should get to know his or her character through this practice.

How to Write a Character Analysis Essay

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When you are writing a Character Sketch, want to look for qualities of character and/or personality traits that you see in the person you want to write about. The main goal of the assignment is to be able to tell something about the person you are researching.

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May 12,  · Students create outlines to write essays. It helps them keep all of their ideas in one place and allows them to see the framework of the essay. or you can simply free write until you feel like you know the character. This particular character sketch example gives you the freedom to do whatever is best for you and your Author: Natasha Quinonez. In composition, a character sketch is a brief description in prose of a particular person or type of person. In an earlyth-century textbook, C.M. Stebbins noted that the character sketch is "a form of exposition which has a deep human interest It calls not only for an explanation of the.

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Unlike most editing & proofreading services, we edit for everything: grammar, spelling, punctuation, idea flow, sentence structure, & more. Get started now! Character Sketch Guidelines A Character Sketch is a great way for your student to assess the characters in the literature they are reading or people that they are researching about. It can give them tools of observation as they look at the many details about another individual.