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AP Literature Course Study Tips

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Previously available as a secure resource only through your AP Course Audit account. Since this exam is now publicly available, you can use the questions without restriction. The Released Exam and the Released Exam are two resources you can use with your students throughout the year.

Some information in these Released Exams may not reflect the current course and exam. Exam Overview The AP English Literature and Composition Exam uses multiple-choice questions and free-response prompts to test students' skills in literary analysis of prose and verse texts.

A literary analysis of a given poem A literary analysis of a given passage of prose fiction this may include drama An analysis that examines a specific concept, issue, or element in a work of literary merit selected by the student. Exam Questions and Scoring Information For free-response questions from prior exams, along with scoring information, check out the tables below. Secure Exams for Classroom Use Includes sample student responses and scoring commentary.

Available on the AP Course Audit site. Log in to your account and then click on the Secure Documents link within the Resources section of your Course Status page. Two sets of student essays From the open-ended free-response question on the AP English Literature Exam—one focusing on The Great Gatsby and the other on unusual student-selected texts—also available on the AP Course Audit website.

Previously Released Exams The Released Exam and the Released Exam are two resources you can use with your students throughout the year. Online Score Reports Access your score reports. Late-Testing Policies Review the late-testing policy and fees. Scoring Guidelines Scoring Commentary. I went home and thought very carefully about how to structure the assignment so the students would be successful and so the essays would hang together and make some kind of sense.

As I walked around the next day listening to the student conversation around the play, themes, characters, and how to put their ideas all together, I realized that I had accidentally stumbled upon something very powerful.

I have also shared this with some of my Writing Project colleagues, many of whom have also found the process to be beneficial. Occasionally, I allow groups of five. Tinker with it until you find what works.

The assignment sheet that I give has all of the directions and I go over this with students first. I ask students to go over the directions again as a group when they begin and to use the directions as a guide. Typically I include a choice of three or four prompts in the directions. The first step for the group is to explore the prompt and to decide as a group which one that they are most interested in responding to and which prompt they are able to cite textual evidence for support.

In the next step, I ask students to brainstorm as a group how they will respond to the prompt. Essentially, this is the prewriting stage. I recommend that they do this collaboratively and on paper. Once the students have brainstormed and organized the ideas, then the students decide who is responsible for writing different paragraphs of the essay. By brainstorming first, everyone can usually write at the same time because they have a good idea of what they will be saying. Without the brainstorming part, the person responsible for the conclusion has to wait for everyone else to write in order to see how to conclude the essay.

After everyone has drafted their piece of the essay, students read the essay in the order that the paragraphs should go in. Brainstorming helps, but invariably ideas come during the actual drafting so reading the essay together helps students to figure out if it makes sense and to make revisions as necessary.

The conversations that the groups have are interesting to me on two levels. The students engage again with the text, often refining their understanding of the text and building that understanding collaboratively with their group members. On another level, however, students also have conversations around writing that are often quite deep.

There are a couple of ways of assembling the essays that I have used.

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The AP Literature and Composition Question 3 essay invited students to consider a character from a work of literature who has received a literal or a figurative gift and how that gift acts as both an advantage and a problem.

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Over the course of the last three years, I have tried this with 9th graders and with students in both AP Literature and AP Language. I have also shared this with some of my Writing Project colleagues, many of whom have also found the process to be beneficial. Here’s how it works I tend to group students in groups of three and four.

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Skill-Building for Success on the AP Literature Exam. There are several things you can do to hone your skills and best prepare for the AP Lit exam. Read Some Books, Maybe More Than Once. One of the most important things you can do to prepare yourself for the AP Literature and Composition exam is to read a lot, and read well. help financial case studies homework A P Literature Essay Help book writers personal essay movie gattaca summary.

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The AP English Literature and Composition Exam uses multiple-choice questions and free-response prompts to test students' skills in literary analysis of prose and verse texts. The multiple choice section tests critical reading skills. Students read several passages and answer questions about the content, form, and style of each. Each essay is read by a different reader. They score essays on a point scale. The scores for the multiple choice section (45%) are then combined with the three essay scores.